Columbus Day History

The 400th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of America inspired the first official Columbus Day holiday in the United States. President Benjamin Harrison issued a proclamation in 1892, “recommending to the people the observance in all their localities of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America…” and describing Columbus as “the pioneer of progress and enlightenment.”                              

In the decades that followed, the Knights of Columbus lobbied state legislatures to declare October 12 a legal holiday. Colorado was the first state to do so on April 1, 1907. New York declared Columbus Day a holiday in 1909 and on October 12, 1909, New York Governor Charles Evans Hughes led a parade that included the crews of two Italian ships, several Italian-American societies, and legions of the Knights of Columbus. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt designated Columbus Day (then celebrated October 12) a national holiday in 1934.

Columbus Day, October 12th

Columbus in its Latin root means dove.  At the beginning of his public ministry Christ went with crowds of His fellow-Hebrews to the river Jordan to receive the baptism of penance, of spiritual healing at the hands of his cousin, John the Baptist.  You will remember that the New Testament tells us that a dove hovered above Him, a visible manifestation of the Holy Spirit and the voice of God the Father spoke, saying “This is My beloved Son.  Hear Him.”  Since that time Christian art has used the dove as a symbol of the Holy Spirit.

As the sun set, the Salve Regina hymn rang out across the Atlantic. Ninety men stood on the decks of three boats, led in prayer by Christopher Columbus, the foreign captain they had come to trust. They had kept the same ritual of evening prayers since they left Spain months ago, but tonight was different. Tomorrow, October 12, 1492, would be the Feast of Our Lady of the Pillar, Spain’s great patroness. Columbus had promised his men that had they not spotted land by her feast day, he would order the ships to turn back, a promise he intended to keep. He knew Our Lady would not abandon the enterprise he had worked so hard to bring about. The signs that they were near land were increasing by the day.

As Columbus climbed the steps to his cabin, his gaze fell instinctively to the western horizon. Off in the distance, he caught sight of a light, like a candle rising and falling on the waves. Quickly, he called another man, who confirmed the sighting. The crews on all three ships were alerted, each man was on deck, peering out for signs of land nearby. At 2 a.m., the cry came out, “Tierra!” Land! The excitement of the crew was such that they hardly noticed the many hours it took to navigate the treacherous reef that surrounded their new destination. As Columbus knelt on the beach to give thanks, the following prayer rose from his lips:

“O Lord, eternal and omnipotent God, Thou hast, by Thy holy word, created the heavens, the earth, and the sea; blessed and glorified be Thy name; praised be Thy majesty, who hast deigned that, by means of Thy unworthy servant, Thy sacred name should be acknowledged and made known in this new quarter of the world.”

In writing the royal treasurer of Spain at the completion of the first journey, he gives the reason all people, present and future, should celebrate what would come to be known as Columbus Day:

“And now ought the King, Queen, Princes, and all their dominions, as well as the whole of Christians, to give thanks to our Savior Jesus Christ who has granted us such a victory and great success. Let processions be ordered, let solemn festivals be celebrated, let the temples be filled with boughs and flowers. Let Christ rejoice upon earth as he does in heaven, to witness the coming salvation of so many people, heretofore given over to perdition. Let us rejoice for the exaltation of our faith, as well as for the augmentation of our temporal prosperity, in which not only Spain but all Christendom shall participate.”

In this the capital of our state, Columbus, the city of the Holy Spirit, and on this, the day of the great explorer, Christopher Columbus, let us pray that the Holy Spirit will guide us and will provide for us, will protect us and be with us.  Keep us close to you in prayer and help us to fall on our knees in thankfulness when we reach the places you are sending us.  We ask this through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Prayer of Columbus

By Walt Whitman

Thou knowest my years entire, my life,

My long and crowded life of active work, not adoration merely;

Thou knowest the prayers and vigils of my youth,

Thou knowest my manhood’s solemn and visionary meditations,

Thou knowest how before I commenced I devoted all to come to Thee,

Thou knowest I have in age ratified all those vows and strictly kept them,

Thou knowest I have not once lost nor faith nor ecstasy in Thee,

In shackles, prison’d, in disgrace, repining not,

Accepting all from Thee, as duly come from Thee.

Portions of Whitman’s “Prayer of Columbus” have been inscribed in gilded letters in the marble wall of the Archives/Navy Memorial metro station in Washington, D.C.

One thought on “Columbus Day History

  1. rgiesken
    Mike, thanks for the well received information about Columbus.

    —–Original Message—–
    From: Knights of Columbus Council 14282 Website <moc.t1574074832opsth1574074832gink.1574074832plo@e1574074832tisbe1574074832w1574074832&gt;
    To: GieskenAIA <moc.l1574074832oa@AI1574074832Aneks1574074832eiG1574074832&gt;
    Sent: Sat, Oct 12, 2019 3:20 pm
    Subject: Columbus Day History

    Columbus Day History

    posted by jfinn
    The 400th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of America inspired the first official Columbus Day holiday in the United States. President Benjamin Harrison issued a proclamation in 1892, “recommending to the people the observance in all their localities of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America…” and describing Columbus as “the pioneer of progress and enlightenment.”                              
    In the decades that followed, the Knights of Columbus lobbied state legislatures to declare October 12 a legal holiday. Colorado was the first state to do so on April 1, 1907. New York declared Columbus Day a holiday in 1909 and on October 12, 1909, New York Governor Charles Evans Hughes led a parade that included the crews of two Italian ships, several Italian-American societies, and legions of the Knights of Columbus. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt designated Columbus Day (then celebrated October 12) a national holiday in 1934.
    Columbus Day, October 12th
    Columbus in its Latin root means dove.  At the beginning of his public ministry Christ went with crowds of His fellow-Hebrews to the river Jordan to receive the baptism of penance, of spiritual healing at the hands of his cousin, John the Baptist.  You will remember that the New Testament tells us that a dove hovered above Him, a visible manifestation of the Holy Spirit and the voice of God the Father spoke, saying “This is My beloved Son.  Hear Him.”  Since that time Christian art has used the dove as a symbol of the Holy Spirit.
    As the sun set, the Salve Regina hymn rang out across the Atlantic. Ninety men stood on the decks of three boats, led in prayer by Christopher Columbus, the foreign captain they had come to trust. They had kept the same ritual of evening prayers since they left Spain months ago, but tonight was different. Tomorrow, October 12, 1492, would be the Feast of Our Lady of the Pillar, Spain’s great patroness. Columbus had promised his men that had they not spotted land by her feast day, he would order the ships to turn back, a promise he intended to keep. He knew Our Lady would not abandon the enterprise he had worked so hard to bring about. The signs that they were near land were increasing by the day.
    As Columbus climbed the steps to his cabin, his gaze fell instinctively to the western horizon. Off in the distance, he caught sight of a light, like a candle rising and falling on the waves. Quickly, he called another man, who confirmed the sighting. The crews on all three ships were alerted, each man was on deck, peering out for signs of land nearby. At 2 a.m., the cry came out, “Tierra!” Land! The excitement of the crew was such that they hardly noticed the many hours it took to navigate the treacherous reef that surrounded their new destination. As Columbus knelt on the beach to give thanks, the following prayer rose from his lips:
    “O Lord, eternal and omnipotent God, Thou hast, by Thy holy word, created the heavens, the earth, and the sea; blessed and glorified be Thy name; praised be Thy majesty, who hast deigned that, by means of Thy unworthy servant, Thy sacred name should be acknowledged and made known in this new quarter of the world.”
    In writing the royal treasurer of Spain at the completion of the first journey, he gives the reason all people, present and future, should celebrate what would come to be known as Columbus Day:
    “And now ought the King, Queen, Princes, and all their dominions, as well as the whole of Christians, to give thanks to our Savior Jesus Christ who has granted us such a victory and great success. Let processions be ordered, let solemn festivals be celebrated, let the temples be filled with boughs and flowers. Let Christ rejoice upon earth as he does in heaven, to witness the coming salvation of so many people, heretofore given over to perdition. Let us rejoice for the exaltation of our faith, as well as for the augmentation of our temporal prosperity, in which not only Spain but all Christendom shall participate.”
    In this the capital of our state, Columbus, the city of the Holy Spirit, and on this, the day of the great explorer, Christopher Columbus, let us pray that the Holy Spirit will guide us and will provide for us, will protect us and be with us.  Keep us close to you in prayer and help us to fall on our knees in thankfulness when we reach the places you are sending us.  We ask this through Christ our Lord.  Amen.
    Prayer of Columbus
    By Walt Whitman
    Thou knowest my years entire, my life,
    My long and crowded life of active work, not adoration merely;
    Thou knowest the prayers and vigils of my youth,
    Thou knowest my manhood’s solemn and visionary meditations,
    Thou knowest how before I commenced I devoted all to come to Thee,
    Thou knowest I have in age ratified all those vows and strictly kept them,
    Thou knowest I have not once lost nor faith nor ecstasy in Thee,
    In shackles, prison’d, in disgrace, repining not,
    Accepting all from Thee, as duly come from Thee.
    Portions of Whitman’s “Prayer of Columbus” have been inscribed in gilded letters in the marble wall of the Archives/Navy Memorial metro station in Washington, D.C.


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